Proof Frontier Project || Grafton Pannell

Posted on by Lance Williams

Photography is a communication tool as well as an art.  In photographing people my goal is to tell their story through my artistic process.  I would describe my shooting style as naturally relational.  From the relationship I have with my subject to the relationship with my surroundings, it all must come naturally to create a finished image.  When that sense of ease can be felt through a photograph you can speak to those viewing it much more.  I love shooting people because they excite me, I'm passionate about them.  Without my passion for people I couldn't create the portraits that I do.  
The inspiration for this photo set came from an accidental mishap.  I commute by bicycle daily and more often than not I have a thermos full of coffee with me.  One morning I had a few 35mm rolls in my pack as well as a thermos and while riding in my thermos leaked.  I found the rolls wet with coffee but thought nothing of it.  After letting them dry out I took them in for development.  Upon viewing the finished scans I noticed streaking in places as well as alterations in color throughout the images.  This was the inspiration to use coffee stained 35mm film.
These photographs are scattered across a few locations in Boise, The Budget Inn, the old Sav-on Cafe, 8th St Recreation area, and two random parked cars near Hyde Park (thank you to whoever drives those beautiful automobiles). I chose these locations with the goal of timelessness in mind.  I wanted to create these 35mm images with a feel that they weren't shot in the year 2015.  We've come a long way over the past 30 years but a lot has stayed the same.  That is why I chose places that have been around in the city of Boise for over 70 years in some cases.  This is also why I chose to shoot these images with a Vietnam era Nikkormat FTn camera.  
You can view more of my work at, on instagram @grafton (, on my adventure blog at or on facebook found at Grafton Foto (


Posted under: #prooffrontierproject

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